Thursday, April 11, 2013

AAR: US freight railroads ready for Panama Canal expansion

Association of American Railroads (AAR) President and CEO Edward Hamberger told the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation that freight railroads are positioning themselves to meet future transportation demands in this country

, including those related directly and indirectly to the expansion of the Panama Canal.

Though the expansion of the Panama Canal will impact each North American railroad differently, Hamberger expressed his confidence in the railroads' ability to handle traffic, whether coming from the East or West.

"The fact is," Hamberger stated, "whether the freight is coming into or leaving from Long Beach or Savannah or Miami or Houston or Seattle or Norfolk or any other major port, our nation's freight railroads are in a good position now and are working diligently to be in an even better position in the future, to offer the safe, efficient, cost-effective service that their customers at ports and elsewhere want and need."

Hamberger explained that rail intermodal shipments are growing due to major private capital investments railroads have been making in equipment and facilities to improve efficiency, reliability and productivity for intermodal rail customers. The rail industry has seen a rise in intermodal volume from 3.1 million containers and trailers in 1980 to 12.3 million units in 2012.

America's freight railroads have been reinvesting more than ever before, Hamberger said. These private investments include $25.5 billion in 2012 and roughly the same amount is projected for 2013.

"Intermodal-specific investments are a part of the $525 billion in investments freight railroads have made since 1980, paid for with the railroads' own funds, not government funds, on locomotives, freight cars, tracks, bridges, tunnels and other infrastructure and equipment," said Hamberger. "Intermodal is a key market segment for each of the major U.S. freight railroads and each has devoted significant resources toward expanding their intermodal capabilities to keep supply chains fluid and effective."

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